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Using honey as a path towards sustainability

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Branding

Intag’s “Misty Mountain” is located in the Cotacachi region of the Ecuadorian province Imbabura. The only way to reach it is through a single winding precarious, road, and it is inhabited by indigenous and mestizo communities. If not for the potential money that copper mining in the land represents, Intag would be ignored by both the government and the international corporations who have been trying to gain rights to the land for the last 30 years.     Through the production and distribution of honey, 5 communities in Intag look to boost their respective economic efforts by planting native mellifluous flowers, harvesting it and selling it locally and internationally through fair trade agreements. 

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The 5 communities of Apuela, Cazarpamba, Pucará, Irubí and Pueblo Viejo can be found within 10-30 minutes from each other. The project looks to teach one family in each community the necessary tools to plant local flora in deforested areas, manage a bee colony, harvest honey and beeswax, package, and finally sell the products. That family then teaches their neighbors and creates a network between the members of the community. Together the five communities unify under one name, “Mela,” and benefit and supplement their income as farmers of the land.  

Logo Construction

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Using honey as a path towards sustainability

mela_04.png

Branding

Intag’s “Misty Mountain” is located in the Cotacachi region of the Ecuadorian province Imbabura. The only way to reach it is through a single winding precarious, road, and it is inhabited by indigenous and mestizo communities. If not for the potential money that copper mining in the land represents, Intag would be ignored by both the government and the international corporations who have been trying to gain rights to the land for the last 30 years.     Through the production and distribution of honey, 5 communities in Intag look to boost their respective economic efforts by planting native mellifluous flowers, harvesting it and selling it locally and internationally through fair trade agreements. 

mela_05.jpg
mela_06.png

The 5 communities of Apuela, Cazarpamba, Pucará, Irubí and Pueblo Viejo can be found within 10-30 minutes from each other. The project looks to teach one family in each community the necessary tools to plant local flora in deforested areas, manage a bee colony, harvest honey and beeswax, package, and finally sell the products. That family then teaches their neighbors and creates a network between the members of the community. Together the five communities unify under one name, “Mela,” and benefit and supplement their income as farmers of the land.  

Logo Design

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Bee colonies only pollinate 3 km around the hive, which means that in a plant-heavy area, like Intag’s Cloud Forest Reserve, each honey comb will have a unique flavor, courtesy of the different microecosystems. To connect consumers with these specific hives and their respective beekeepers, Mela’s branding makes it easy to identify the community, family and colony through unique patterns, and additional information about the specific goals through the paper labels. 

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